• Home
  • News
  • '66 Minutes in Damascus' re-enacts Syrian violence
22 June 2012

'66 Minutes in Damascus' re-enacts Syrian violence

AUDIENCES are dragged, quite literally, one step closer to the violent crisis in Syria, with a theatre production that recreates some of the darker circumstances now gripping the country.

Commissioned by London International Festival of Theatre, ‘66 Minutes in Damascus’ is the work of Lebanese film-maker and theatre director Lucien Bourjeily, acclaimed for bringing improvisation theatre to the streets of Beirut during the political turmoil of 2008.

Bourjeily has followed on from this practice with a hyper-real production that sees participants drawn into a simulated hostage crisis at the hands of the notorious Syrian secret service.

The work was inspired by accounts of Syrian detention centres from former detainees, documented by foreign journalists and local activists since the beginning of the uprising almost 18 months ago.

Complete with hoods, dark cells and hand-cuffed interrogations, ’66 Minutes’ gives a glimpse into the conditions experienced by activists, political prisoners and arbitrary victims of the regime crackdown.

The striking set in the remarkably grim bowels of Shoreditch Town Hall, alongside seamless performances and a gritty script provide a vivid, if fleeting, reminder of the brutal realities which persist behind the media headlines.

66 Minutes in Damascus gives an insight into life in Syria

66 Minutes in Damascus gives an insight into life in Syria

66 Minutes in Damascus gives an insight into life in Syria

Archives,Reviews,News

Special Offers

Amazing offers

Offers